Aerial firefighters urge crackdown on drone use

By
Updated: June 20, 2020

Aerial firefighters urge crackdown on drone use

Aerial drone use has grown, largely because of the internet and social media. But it is up in the air as to what should become of it, said Andrew Parson, a professor of environmental studies at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, who has tracked UAS activity in the U.S. since he began studying it in 2014.

“The drone is an amazing thing in the sense that it can be used for what we call ‘public security purposes’ or ‘public safety’ purposes,” he said in an email. “If you’re going to use it, you need to know exactly what you’re getting into.”

The FAA has banned several uses of a quadcopter aircraft for civil surveillance, including flying near school바카라s, hospitals and police stations. The National Air and Space Museum banned the use of one in 2014 when drones were first regulated for drone use for military reconnaissance purposes.

But the rule더킹카지노s are open to interpretation and many drone users say they are finding that the legalities of drones aren’t as stringent as they used to be. One user, who wishes to remain anonymous, said using a UAS is “so easy and I can stay safe.”

Drones are becoming used in places where they would be illegal, such as parks, he said. One of the most common uses is as part of law enforcement, but the same user said one person used the drone for surveillance of a church in the San Francisco Bay area.

The FAA’s new “Safety of Resourcing” guidelines are intended to address some of these concerns, Parson said.

Among the potential concerns:

Privacy is a concern. The FAA has not yet said how it will define what constitutes a legal use, although it doesn’t expect those in violation to be fined.

As more UASs are being used in public places, they pose risk to the environment, the operator said.

FCC is moving to regulate more uses of drones, Parson said. One proposal, fro바카라m the agency’s staff, would require the Federal Aviation Administration to set guidelines that apply to UASs as well.

The U.S. is among many countries, such as Israel and Russia, that restrict UAS activity, but it’s unclear how these countries are meeting the same standards as the U.S.

Drones are not a panacea for everything, Parson said. But they’ve made it easier for users to do something more important than flying by themselves